Halloween Safety Tips

With Halloween just a few weeks away, it is important to go over the basic safety tips with children and adults to avoid any accidents while enjoying the holiday festivities. Due to the pandemic, the world has not been able to celebrate the spooky season as usual and activities and celebrations needed to be adjusted to ensure everyone involved stays safe and healthy. This year, it is important to take the same approach with health in mind, but as the seasons change so do the protocols and safety measures.

Here are some classic and new ways to stay safe while having fun.

 

Make a Game Plan

 Since spookiness and mystery are a big part of the spirit of Halloween, many activities people participate in occur at night in the dark. While thinking of your costume this year, it is best to consider light colours and bright features, like reflective tape, so that you are easier to spot. Discuss with your friends or loved ones where you will be going and how to communicate, whether you are going to a party or even trick-or-treating. Choose a well-lit area that the group knows well and try to stick together. Having a safety plan and agenda is crucial for a night when more pranks and mischief are occurring. Even with a well-thought-out plan accidents can still unfold amongst the fun. After calling 911 in an emergency, call #1000 for expert help from the personal injury lawyers at Dye & Russell.

 

Supervise the Fun

With all the excitement of creative costumes, haunted houses, parties, and trick-or-treating comes many opportunities for accidents to happen. Supervising the activities is crucial to avoid any injury that could interrupt the holiday festivities. After trick-or-treating, all the candy the kids have proudly collected needs to be examined and sorted to detect any tampering or allergies. Any candy that seems suspicious should be tossed out immediately and kept out of children’s reach. Along the same lines for adults, it is important to not consume any suspicious drinks or food and to monitor how much is consumed. We cannot keep track of what is going on around us 24/7 and accidents may happen in those moments. After an accident, it is smart to contact a personal injury lawyer, like the ones at Dye & Russell, to understand your next steps and the resources available to you.  We are here to support you after a personal injury and help you along the road to recovery.

 

Caution About Stranger Danger

Talk with your loved ones about which houses to approach when trick-or-treating and the dangers of strangers on Halloween. Amongst the costumes, masks, and makeup, it can be harder to recognize the people around you, especially at night. Inform your loved ones not to approach homes or buildings with the lights off, ones that have no decorations, and explain the dangers of entering a stranger’s home. Stay in your groups and with the people you know to have a fun and memorable holiday.

 

Even when precautions are taken, accidents can still occur. If you or a loved one has been involved in an accident, contact the professionals at Dye & Russell today for your FREE Claim Assessment and more helpful resources. Reach us toll-free at 1-877-883-6171 or visit us online to speak with a live agent. Your road to recovery is important to us.

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Campfire Safety

Camping season is something Canadians proudly take advantage of every summer with our picturesque landscapes and great weather. Heading to the woods and experiencing all the fun memories camping brings is a staple in our country. Activities like going for a hike, fishing on one of Ontario’s thousands of lakes or gathering around the campfire for ghost stories and s’mores, can bring a ton of excitement to your summer. Ending your day with a warm glowing fire is most camper’s tradition to ending the day. Properly building and extinguishing your campfire is crucial to lowering the risk of an accident.

Campfires are at high risk for injury if not handled with care and proper supervision. An unwatched or carelessly built campfire can result in a dangerous situation that could have been easily avoided by following these helpful tips:

 

Preparation

Being prepared is crucial when building a fire. The first step is knowing whether you are allowed to even do so or not. A fire ban may be in place due to the weather and the potential for wildfires to start. There should be postings by Ontario Parks or local rangers that indicate if there is a fire ban or not, typically indicated by a coloured gauge. The wind is also another weather factor to consider as strong winds and flames create greatly unsafe conditions that can lead to an injury. Should an injury take place, it is critical to handle everything that follows with care and caution. The experts at Dye & Russell are fully prepared to help you on your road to recovery, beginning with a free claim assessment.

 

Location

After ensuring that there is no fire ban you can move on to picking the best spot for you and your loved ones to gather around. Picking a site that is close to the water and sheltered from the wind is key in creating a safe space. Limiting the possibility of fire spreading and having access to water in case of a spread or burn emergency could save lives if an accident occurs. Our lawyers at Dye & Russell are experienced with injuries involving campfires and utilize their in-depth knowledge towards getting what you deserve.

 

Building

Once a spot is chosen it is time to prep the area–build your fire away from anything that may be flammable such as tents, dry/dead grass, unsafe chemicals, or overhanging branches. The ground should be even to build a pit with a perimeter of 10-feet or more to act as a safety zone.

After your logs are in place you are ready to start your fire. Gather some crumpled paper or a fire starter to light the logs and do not use any flammable liquids such as gasoline. Injuries involving gasoline and campfires can be traumatic and can even result in death. Remember to STOP, DROP, and ROLL if ever caught on fire and in danger of being burned. If you or a loved one have suffered a personal injury it is critical you reach out to a professional injury lawyer like the ones at Dye & Russell to have your claim assessed.

 

Extinguish

Never leave your campfire unattended. Once it is time to turn in for the night make sure to extinguish the flames properly and safely. The best course of action is to allow the wood to burn down to ashes and then douse the remains with water while stirring to ensure everything is out and cooled. Camping and conversations around a campfire are memorable for years to come, so it is best to follow these safety tips to make those memories good ones.

 

Accidents do occur even when precautions are taken– If you or a loved one has been involved in an accident, contact the professionals at Dye & Russell today for your FREE Claim Assessment and more helpful resources. Reach us toll-free at 1-877-883-6171 or visit us online to speak with a live agent. Your road to recovery is important to us.

 

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Boating Safety Tips: What You Need To Know

The warmer months are here and that means enjoying the sun and summer activities. Boating is incredibly popular with things to do like tubbing, water skiing, fishing, or swimming out in the lake. These are all fun things to de-stress and enjoy this sunny season, but nevertheless, it is crucial to be aware of boat safety rules and regulations. According to the Canadian Red Cross there are over 125+ preventable boating-related fatalities that happen across Canada each year.

If you are your loved ones are planning on enjoying some time on a boat this summer, then here are some ways to prepare for the ride and minimize the risk of injury:


Make a Checklist

It is easy to get caught up in the excitement of getting out on a boat— having a thorough checklist to go over before taking off is a great way to be prepared for any possible emergencies out on the water.

Check the Weather

Take a look at the local weather forecast. The days leading up to your departure is crucial to ensuring you are aware of any possibly changes that could put you in danger. Avoid strong or rough winds, darkening clouds, temperature fluxes, or changes to the waves. Getting caught in a storm can result in serious injury to you or your passengers. If you find yourself in this position our lawyers at Dye & Russell know what to do to get you the compensation you deserve. Do not delay, contact us today if you have sustained injuries or damages on a boat in Ontario.

Develop a Float Plan

Inform a family member or marina staff of your contact information and emergency plan of action. Letting someone know this information along with trip destinations, the warning or help signals to be used, and your boats registration information can be critical in getting you to safety if an emergency occurs. Even the most experienced boaters can sustain injuries or be involved in accidents out on the water. Dye & Russell has the experience to help in your boating accident personal injury case.

Have your tools ready

There are many items that you need to have onboard to ensure everyone is safe while out on the water. Some items and equipment you will need but are not limited to:

  • Life jackets
  • First aid kit
  • Sunscreen
  • Food and water
  • Proper identification, licenses, boat documentation
  • Cellphone and wireless charging bank
  • Electrical tape
  • Emergency flashlight
  • Distress signals
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Extra fuel
  • Emergency paddles
  • Blankets

Wear A Life Jacket

Did you know the Red Cross reported that less than 50% of Canadians always wear their life jackets when boating? Life jackets are crucial in the prevention of accidental drownings and even help in preventing hypothermia when exposed to cold water conditions for too long.

Besides being a legal requirement, another reason to have life jackets on board is for individuals that may not know how to swim or are generally weak swimmers. In the event of an accident where flooding occurs and your boat begins taking on water, the risk of a slip and fall injury increases. Wearing a life jacket can save a life if someone were to slip and fall into the water or experience a head injury.

Exploring the many great lakes and waters that Canada has to offer is exciting but knowing proper boat safety is key in achieving an accident-free summer. There are many opportunities for injury with all of the different types of activities to enjoy in or on the water, knowing who to contact in the wake of an accident will reduce the stress and anxiety related to your injury.

 

If you or a loved one has been involved in an accident, contact the professionals at Dye & Russell today for your FREE Claim Assessment and more helpful resources. Reach us toll free at 1-877-883-6171 or visit us online to speak with a live agent. Your road to recovery is important to us.

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Water Safety Tips for Toddlers & Children

Teaching your kids to swim & understanding how to be safe around pools or open water is a responsibility every parent takes on. Knowing your toddler or child(ren) can swim can be comforting for parents, but it shouldn’t be your only strategy for keeping them safe.

You teach them to stop & look both ways before crossing the street, not to run out on to the road, to look for cars & where to safely cross the street, yet you wouldn’t leave your toddler or young child unattended playing by the road.

The same goes for pools, open water & even bathtubs. Drownings can occur in as little as 1.5 inches (4 cm) of water.

 

Supervision

A parent or guardian should always be present when toddlers & or young children are near water. They should always know where their child(ren) are & what potential hazards are nearby.

Creating barriers between the child(ren) & the water reduces the ability & likelihood that the child can reach the hazard. Fencing around a pool is a common method used to keep the area inaccessible. Self-latching or locking gates that are also self-closing add additional safety measures. Any gates or barriers should be regularly inspected to ensure they’re functioning properly.

 

Pool Rules

Having established pool rules can help instill the need for safety around the water.

The most common & well-known pool rule of them all is no running around the pool. A slip & fall is more likely to occur on wet surfaces & can result in serious injury.

Cleaning up the pool deck so it’s free from water toys or other pool accessories can minimize a child’s temptation to play in that area. It can also reduce the potential for someone to trip over the objects & fall into the water headfirst.

No adult, no entry. Teach them that entering the pool, lake, pond etc. can only be done once a parent has done so. This will enforce to toddlers & younger children that they shouldn’t be going in the water by themselves & that an adult needs to be with them to be in the water.

Follow through. If you say you’re going to go swimming, make sure you keep that promise. By following through with this promise, the child(ren) won’t feel as strong of a need to go near the water when you aren’t around.

 

Open Water VS Swimming Pool

Swimming at the cottage or in another open body of water is not the same as swimming in a pool at home or recreation centre. A swimming pool is a contained space where the elements can be controlled. Open water brings new hazards that swimmers are faced with. Strong currents, colder water temperatures, greater distances to land or shore, undertows, & even other watercrafts to name a few.

If you or a child has become caught in a river current or fast moving water, the Canadian Red Cross suggests rolling on your back & pointing your feet downstream. This is to avoid hitting any obstacles headfirst. When out of the strongest part of the current, swim straight towards the shore.

 

Lifejackets & Personal Flotation Devices (PFD)

Drowning accidents can be preventable. When worn properly, a Canadian approved standard lifejacket is designed to turn an unconscious person from their front, over to their back so their face up in the water, allowing them to breathe.

When buying a lifejacket for a child there are certain things you want to look for:

  • Canadian approval label containing the chest size or weight it is intended for
  • Large collars will help support a child’s head & give additional protection
  • A strap on the collar to grab on to
  • A secure strap that fastens between the child’s legs, so the device doesn’t slip off
  • Bright colours are more noticeable in the water; red, yellow & orange are preferred options

Having a lifejacket or PFD close by, even within reach, isn’t close enough. The need for adult supervision is always required around water & lifejackets or PFDs aren’t a replacement.

 

If you or someone you know has been involved in an accident your road to recovery is important to us. Fast dial #1000 free from your cell and our experienced team at Dye and Russell will get you the support you need.

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Spring in to Cycling Season

One of the more popular past times when the weather starts to get nicer is cycling. Now that Spring has finally sprung, you can expect to see an increase in the number of people spending time outdoors. Cycling is a great way to stay healthy, remain active and can be enjoyed by the whole family.

Among all the benefits cycling has to offer, there are also a number of risks. Here are our tips on how to stay safe as you kick off this cycle season.

Check your bike

Its been a while since your bike has seen the outdoors. Make sure you give it a once over before you take it out for the first ride of the season. Check for things such as tire pressure and whether the tire spokes are secure and undamaged. Do your brakes work? What about the chain, has it rusted? Determine what, if any, issues you have and what your next step is. Can you fix it yourself, or do you need to call a repair shop? If you’re unsure, bring it in to a bike shop just in case.

Safety equipment

Hitting the road again after a long winter can be a bit nerve wracking. Taking things slow and following the proper steps to being safe on the road can help prevent injury later. We can argue that a helmet is the most important piece of equipment for a cyclist. It can help prevent against concussions and even brain injury. Other preventative safety measures can include adding reflectors and lights to your bike and wearing bright clothes. Keeping yourself visible is the key.

Hit the Road

At last, the time has finally come. Your bike has been through its version of spring cleaning and you’re ready to go. Make sure you check both ways before you cross the street, brush up on your hand signals, and be careful around areas that can become slippery and dangerous when wet (e.g., wood, painted brick).

 

Even if you and your children are practicing safe cycling, sometimes you can still be injured by others. If you or someone you love has been injured by another party’s negligence while cycling we can help with their recovery journey.

Fast dial #1000 free from your cell and we’ll get you the support you need.

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A parent’s guide to pool safety

With summer making its arrival in Canada, pool season has begun. Pool safety is an important topic this time of year. According to the Lifesaving Society, hundreds of Canadians die each year from drowning. Parents, take note – for children under 10, drowning is the second leading cause of preventable death and children under five are the most at risk of drowning.

So, before you, or your children, dip your toes into the backyard pool, it’s important to review some pool safety tips.

1. Appoint a supervisor

Children of all ages require active supervision when in the pool. This means a parent/guardian who is placing their whole attention on the water. Accidents can happen quickly, and a rapid response time is critical. Don’t be fooled by Hollywood films – drowning is quiet and splashing or screaming doesn’t occur. The attention of a parent/guardian can be the difference between life and death.

2. No diving in shallow pools

Most backyard pools are not deep enough for diving, no matter the age of the diver. This is a frequent cause of injury. It’s important to do your own research into what your pool’s size allows. Establish clear rules with your children about diving in the pool, especially in the shallower end. Some parents choose to put up signage, which is available from many hardware stores, as a reminder. Most importantly, talk with your kids and make sure they understand your family’s pool safety rules.

3. Ensure proper fencing

Small children’s curiosity can lead to drowning by falling into pools. Multiple items are available for purchase which can prevent unsupervised access to water by young children. Examples include latching gates and four-sided fencing. It’s important to comply with any local fencing bylaws in your area so make sure to research these before you open your pool for the summer.

4. Arms’ reach matters

For children under 5, it’s important to keep them within arms’ reach when in the water. While supervision may be sufficient for older kids, younger children require the physical support and balance of a parent. This is a great opportunity to teach your kids the basics of swimming and create lasting memories.

If you have been injured, and need legal assistance, call #1000 on your cell phone for free. We will offer you a free claim assessment.

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How to stay safe while trick-or-treating

Halloween can be an exciting time of year for children, but the highlight of Halloween, trick or treating, can come with a lot of safety hazards and dangers. Make sure you read these seven tips from The National Safety Council to help you keep yourself and your loved ones safe while trick-or-treating this Halloween.

1. Supervise young children

A young child should never go trick-or-treating alone. A parent or responsible adult should always accompany young children as they do their rounds throughout the neighbourhood for treats.

2. Set guidelines for the evening

If your children are older and are going out without you, it’s a good idea to set some guidelines before they leave for the evening. Plan and go over with your child a route that is safe and they will stick to. Staying in well-lit and familiar areas make for a safer evening. Remind your child to avoid trick-or-treating alone and stay with a buddy or a group. Before they leave decide on a time when they should expected to be home.

3. Pick and choose where to knock

While you’re out with your children, only approach homes that have a porch light on. Make sure to explain this to your children if they are going out without you as well. Not only will the bad lighting pose a safety issue but it also indicates that a knock on the door will not be welcomed. A lack of outdoor lights or decorations means there’s a good chance they aren’t participating in the Halloween fun.

4. Educate about stranger danger

Trick-or-treating on Halloween means your child might be interacting with a lot of strangers. While you probably have told your child on other occasions to never get into a stranger’s car or to never go into a stranger’s home it’s a good time to remind them before the trick-or-treating begins. The fun and excitement of Halloween can be distracting so let them know if they’re offered to go with a stranger, get into a stranger’s car or enter a stranger’s home to get a treat to say no.

5. Be aware

There can be lots of distractions on Halloween so it’s important to stay focused on where you’re going. Being glued to a phone and not paying attention to where you are going can be a problem for both parents and children. Keeping your eyes up, using a flashlight, looking both ways before crossing the street and walking instead of running can go a long way in keeping you and your children safe.

6. Wait to eat the treats

Whether your child is going out on their own or with you, setting a rule to wait to munch on their treats till arriving home is a good idea. Going through your child’s candy loot is essential for safety. Look at each item for tampering with the packaging and any allergens that might affect your child. Homemade treats, unless made by a close family member or friend you can trust, should be thrown out.

7. Pick your costume carefully

Your costume plays a big role in your Halloween safety. All parts of your child’s costume should be fire-resistant and if you or your children will be going out after dark, attaching reflective tape to their costumes and treat bags is a good way for them to stay visible. Also, if you or your child are using makeup as part of a costume ensure it’s nontoxic, test it in a small area before applying lots and remove all of it before going to sleep.

If you have been injured, and need legal assistance, call #1000 on your cell phone for free. We will offer you a free claim assessment.

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What every parent ought to know about bike safety

Your guide to make your child’s ride to school a safe one.

Cycling to school can be a great opportunity for you and your children. Not only does it begin creating healthy fitness habits for your child, but it also creates a bonding activity for the both of you.

However, cycling poses some serious dangers to your child. Before you hit the road, or trail, with your kids make sure you read over these tips from Liv:

1. Pick an appropriate route

Before venturing out with your children on a bike-ride to school consider the route you are going to take. Ride it first on your own and notice any key aspects of the route. Are there bike paths available? What is the traffic like when you will be biking? How long or steep is the ride? If the route has lots of traffic, is too difficult for you child’s fitness level, or poses dangers for their experience level you should find a safe and appropriate route for them, or reconsider.

2. Prepare your child’s bike

Kids grow quickly, and that means they can grow out of their bicycles quickly. Make sure that your    child’s bike still fits, and that it works properly. Teach your children to check the air pressure, breaks and chain before hopping on their bike each time to prevent an accident or injury. Also, your child’s bike should have a horn or bell, as well as proper lights in case of inclement weather or riding at night.

3. Get and adjust a certified helmet

According to Ontario law anyone under the age of 18 must wear a helmet while cycling. But it takes more than just wearing one to protect your child. The helmet needs to fit properly. While purchasing a helmet make sure it is the correct size, as well as certified, and before your child wears the helmet make sure you adjust it for proper fit. Never let your child wear a helmet that has already experienced impact.

4. Avoid dangerous clothing

Wearing certain types of clothing while biking can create a safety hazard for your children. Children should avoid wearing footwear that could get caught in parts of the bike—like running shoes with untied shoe laces or loose sandals. Also, loose pant legs or other loose pieces of clothing below the waist can become caught in parts of the bike and should be avoided.

5. Educate on bike safety

Before you and your child leave home on your bikes you should talk to your child about bike safety. Going through the basics of yielding to and communicating with pedestrians, biking on the right side in a straight predictable line, and taking caution at intersections or driveways is a must. Also, have your children practice good communication with drivers.  Making eye contact with drivers to make sure they are seen and using biking signals to communicate with drivers are skills they should learn as early as possible.

Even if you and your children are practicing safe cycling, sometimes you can still be injured by others. If you or someone you love has been injured by another party’s negligence while cycling we can help with their recovery journey.

Fast dial #1000 free from your cell and we’ll get you the support you need.

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Help your children have a safe summer: how to avoid injuries at home

It’s that time of year again. The weather is getting warmer, pools are opening and children are getting ready for summer break.

But with time away from the classroom and more time spent playing and exploring, it is important to make sure your child’s safety is your number one priority. A great way to do this is to ensure your home is safe for their summer activities.

In order to help keep your children out of harm’s way the Canada Safety Council recommends a number of different actions you can take to make your home a safer place.

1. Communication

Talk with your children about injury prevention. This will help to build positive attitudes around safety. Making sure to incorporate safety into your summer plans will help children to learn about injury prevention through example.

2. Vehicles

Make sure to protect your keys, as well as ensure your car doors and trunk are locked when your car is parked at home. Children may try to get inside your car to play. This can result in them trying to drive or locking themselves inside. Also, do a walk-around check of your vehicle for anything that may be hiding in your blind spots before driving.

3. Windows and Balconies

Supervise children while they are on a balcony or near a screened window, and remove objects they can use to climb to a balcony or window ledge. Falls are the leading cause of unintentional injury causing hospitalization among children in Canada. Children can push through or fall from these places so it is important to protect children in these locations.

4. Blinds

Blind cords can pose a strangulation hazard to young children. Keep cords out of their reach, and cut and shorten the ends of looped cords. Another option is switching to curtains.

5. Swimming Pools

Do you have a pool at home? If so, swimmers should be supervised at all times and weak swimmers should always wear a life jacket or PFD. Backyard pools are the number one location where children under the age of five drown, and most are alone when it occurs.

6. Trampolines

Trampolines can be a fun summer toy for children to play with, but they can also be very dangerous. Children under the age of six shouldn’t be using a trampoline and adults should inspect the trampoline and supervise children while they use it. To prevent injury make sure children are using the trampoline one at a time, not jumping onto, or off of, the trampoline and not doing flips or somersaults.

7. Sun Protection

The warm weather in summer means your children will probably be playing outside. Make sure to protect them from the sun by applying SPF 15 or higher at least 20 minutes before going out and reapplying often. Also, children under the age of one should be kept out of the sun.

If you have been injured, and need legal assistance, call #1000 on your cell phone for free. We will offer you a free claim assessment.

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